The Middle West Review is an interdisciplinary journal about the American Midwest published by the University of Nebraska Press. It is the only publication dedicated exclusively to the study of the Midwest as a region. It provides a forum for scholars and nonscholars alike to explore the contested meanings of midwestern identity, history, geography, society, culture, and politics. What states belong within the Midwest? Is the Midwest inherently rural? Are Chicago and Pacific Junction, Iowa, part of the same region? If so, what links them? What traditions or features define the Midwest? Does the Midwest have a particular economic identity? Is the Midwest “queer”? How does the Midwest’s racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity square with its popular perception as a homogenous space? Is the Midwest “distinctive”? If so, why do Americans often conceive of it as a “normative” site, one divorced from the historical intrigue and conflict of the South and the West? The Middle West Review seeks to examine these and other questions and, in turn, help revitalize the study of the American Midwest.

The inaugural issue of the journal was published in the fall of 2014, and the second issue was published in April 2015. You can find subscription information and other details at the University of Nebraska Press website. The journal is available electronically through Project MUSE.

In the near future, Middle West Review will launch a digital component in conjunction with the print journal.